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2017 da Vinci Scholars Include Repeat Winners

2017 da Vinci Scholars from AME: Jim Encinas, Alexander Marshall, Alexander McCarthy and David Malboeuf Each year, the College of Engineering awards 10 da Vinci scholarships to exceptional students. The scholarship program is funded by members of the College's da Vinci Circle – a group of roughly 300 individuals and corporations whose gifts support our faculty and students' ongoing research.

Congratulations to the four 2017 da Vinci Scholars from the UA Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering: Jim Encinas, David Malboeuf, Alexander Marshall and Alexander Mccarthy.

This is Encinas and Marshall's second consecutive year as da Vinci Scholar recipients.


Photo (clockwise from left): Jim Encinas, Alexander Marshall, David Malboeuf and Alexander Mccarthy.




TLA Startup of the Year Boasts AME-Developed Products

Awards presented to winners of TLA's I-Squared Expo & AwardsTech Launch Arizona recently held its fourth annual I-Squared Expo & Awards, highlighting University of Arizona researchers whose inventions impact the quality of life of people in Tucson, across Arizona and throughout the world.

New this year was a startup showcase, which included MetOxs Solutions, a company specializing in providing technology for more sustainable mining and energy production.

MetOxs was selected as the I-Squared Startup of the Year for its impressive portfolio, including corrosion sensors for metal pipes developed with the assistance of AME professor Peiwen "Perry" Li. Li also collaborated on the company's flagship process, a...




Design Day 2017: The Next Big Thing, 100 Times Over

Student at Design DayEngineering affects virtually every aspect of our lives, and at the University of Arizona’s Engineering Design Day on May 1, more than 500 students – including 159 seniors from the UA Department of Aerospace and Mechanical Engineering – inte​nd to prove it.

The public is invited to see the displays in the Student Union Memorial Center Grand Ballroom and on the UA Mall from 11 a.m. until 4 p.m., and to attend the awards ceremony in the ballroom from 4 to 5:30 p.m., when industry sponsors will present more than $25,000 in cash prizes to project teams.

Download the UA Engineering Design app, available for iOS and Android! Find your favorite project and presenter, and then – new this year! – post to social media directly from the...




Alumna's Startup Licenses Heart Graft Technology

Tucson-based Avery Therapeutics Inc. has licensed a beating heart graft technology, MyCardia, that has been shown to improve heart functions in preclinical studies. Left to right: Drs. Jen Koevary, Jordan Lancaster and Steve Goldman of Avery Therapeutics

MyCardia is a biologically active cardiac graft that can be surgically affixed to a heart to assist function for patients with conditions such as chronic heart failure. Tech Launch Arizona, the office of the UA that commercializes inventions stemming from University research, facilitated the process of defining and protecting the heart graft technology.

The commercial license is a big boost for Avery's leadership team, including chief operating officer Jen Watson Koevary, who received her BS in mechanical engineering in 2008 before earning a doctorate in biomedical engineering.

Koevary was named...




Internship Leads to Job Offer for AME Senior

Mechanical engineering senior Morgan Struble isn't too worried about job prospects after she graduates – she's already employed. A student works on a solution while a mentor looks on at the UA STEM Learning Center

Struble was among the first University of Arizona students to take part in a program launched by the UA STEM Learning Center that pairs students with companies offering internships. Through the program, she landed a three-month position at Arizona Public Service as a fossil generation intern, an ideal fit for someone also studying mining and geological engineering.

"My internship was extremely beneficial," Struble said. "With everyone's help, I was able to make great progress on my assigned projects, and I think that this really radiated with the company and helped me get a job."

After graduation in May, Struble will head to Buckeye, Arizona, and the Redhawk Power Station where she'll serve as a full-time engineer.

Photo courtesy of John...




University of Arizona College of Engineering